Last updated on: 3/3/2008 | Author: ProCon.org

Alan B. Krueger, PhD Biography

Title:
Bendheim Professor of Economics and Public Policy at Princeton University
Position:
Pro to the question "Should the Government Allow Immigrants Who Are Here Illegally to Become US Citizens?"
Reasoning:

“Immigration policy involves fundamental issues about what and who we are as a country. There are no simple answers on immigration policy because different people can legitimately assign different weights to the welfare of new immigrants, recent immigrants, and various groups of natives. In addition, there is considerable debate and disagreement among economists about the economic impacts of immigration. The Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act of 2006 [which included a path to citizenship]… seems to represent a reasonable compromise in view of the competing interests of different stakeholders.”

“Two Labor Economic Issues for the Immigration Debate,” Center for American Progress, Apr. 4, 2006

Involvement and Affiliations:
  • Bendheim Professor, Economics & Public Policy, Princeton University, 1992-present
  • Professor of Economics & Public Affairs, Princeton University, 1992-present
  • Research Associate, National Bureau of Economic Research, 1992-present
  • Chief Economist, National Council on Economic Education, 2003-present
  • Economic Scene Columnist, The New York Times, 2000-2006
  • Winner, IZA Prize for Labor Economics, 2006
  • Elected Fellow, Society of Labor Economists, 2006
  • Docteur Honoris Causa, Université Libre de Bruxelles, 2005
  • Elected Fellow, American Academy of Political and Social Science, 2003
  • Elected Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 2002
  • Awarded, Mahalanobis Memorial Medal, Indian Econometric Society, 2001
  • Chief Economist, U.S. Department of Labor, 1994-1995
  • Assistant Professor of Economics & Public Affairs, Princeton University, 1987-1992
Education:
  • PhD, Economics, Harvard University, 1987
  • MA, Economics, Harvard University, 1985
  • BS, with Honors, Industrial & Labor Relations, Cornell University, 1983
Other:
  • None found